• Fiona McIntosh: Voyager Author of the Month

    Fiona McIntosh was born and raised in Sussex in the UK, but also spent early childhood years in West Africa. She left a PR career in London to travel and settled in Australia in 1980. She has since roamed the world working for her own travel publishing company, which she runs with her husband. She lives in Adelaide with her husband and twin sons. Her website is at www.fionamcintosh.com.

    Her latest book, The Scrivener's Tale, is a stand-alone and takes us back to the world of Morgravia from her very first series, The Quickening:


    About The Scrivener's Tale:

    In the bookshops and cafes of present-day Paris, ex-psychologist Gabe Figaret is trying to put his shattered life back together. When another doctor, Reynard, asks him to help with a delusional female patient, Gabe is reluctant... until he meets her. At first Gabe thinks the woman, Angelina, is merely terrified of Reynard, but he quickly discovers she is not quite what she seems.

    As his relationship with Angelina deepens, Gabe's life in Paris becomes increasingly unstable. He senses a presence watching and following every move he makes, and yet he finds Angelina increasingly irresistible.

    When Angelina tells Gabe he must kill her and flee to a place she calls Morgravia, he is horrified. But then Angelina shows him that the cathedral he has dreamt about since childhood is real and exists in Morgravia.

    A special 10th Anniversary edition of her first fantasy book, Myrren's Gift, will be released in December!

     

     

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Australian Speculative Fiction Blog Carnival

Apologies for the late-runningness of this Blog Carnival, we have been recovering from our fifteenth birthday party (by which I mean, doing all the work neglected during planning the celebrations). We now feel a  bit old and tired ;). Below are all the fabbity fab blog posts we could round up from around and after (to paraphrase Juan Antonio) the best WorldCon ever. These are just the tip of the iceberg, so if you have more, post below and I will add them.

The Hugo winners – thanks to Tehani
The Ditmar finals list and winners on Locus
Tehani’s AussieCon report
Voyager’s AussieCon thoughts One Two and Three
Global Voyager announcement
Gail Carriger on WorldCon
Longest report ever for AussieCon! From the Spec Fic Writers of Singapore
Peter Brett’s brief blog on his visit to WorldCon and Australia
Trudi Canavan’s AussieCon report
Helen Lowe’s AussieCon report at the Orbit blog
Duncan Lay’s AussieCon report
Kathleen Jenning’s gorgeous AussieCon round up with illustrations!
Tehani’s round up of the open short story markets
On Australian writing …
K J Taylor comes to dinner with fellow Voyager authors
Gillian’s interview with Mary Victoria
Jonathan Strahan makes it safely home (no swine flu this time!)
A Vampire’s AussieCon report
An interview with Jack Dann, Janeen Webb and Yaritji Green by Gillian
A bit of Baggage by Monica Carroll
Eneit’s blog – Baggage blogtour and interviews
Launch of Worlds Next Door report
KJ Taylor pics and post from the Voyager part
Maria Quinn wins the Norma K Hemming Award
Tehani and Alex revisit The Belgariad series by David Eddings
Fiona McIntosh on stand alone novels
Gillian on AussieCon and once more with feeling
Glenda Larke at WorldCon
George R R Martin touches down in Melbourne and reminds people that WorldCon is the Granddaddy of all events!
Alan Baxter’s wrap up
Talking Squid WorldCon update
Books by Canberra Spec Fic Writers
Gary Kemble’s posts on AussiCon
Two amazing trailers talking about A Game of Thrones on HBO posted on the Voyager blog

Not posted strictly within this month’s carnival dates but … taken during the time – Cory Doctorow sings a pirate ditty

 

To submit events for next month’s carnival … click here.

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The stormtroopers have arrived: Saturday at Worldcon

So, yesterday dawned a bit too bright and early for anyone celebrating Voyager’s 15th birthday and the Ditmars, but as a famous person once said: the con must go on. And so it did. We went to lots of panels, including one on cover art: a dying form? If the images shown by GoH Shaun Tan are any indication, then no, it is not! Was lovely to see Nick Stathopoulos’s cover for Dreaming Down-Under there – and we plan to go to the Dreaming Again again panel at 2pm today.
Around lunchtime we spied a very big queue indeed – no surprises, George was doing a signing. In the end they had to organize a second signing later in the day to give fans a chance to get to the front and the grrm the chance not to get RSI.
We saw Peter V Brett and Cory Doctorow discussing online presence and fan interaction – a great insight into how the author deals with such relationships. We also caught a bevy of Voyager authors talking about the trilogy in fantasy-why is it so common now? A whose choice is it? Fiona Mcintosh ably chaired the panel between Glenda Larke, Trudi Canavan and Russell Kirkpatrick and also forced ‘dettol lollies’ on the unsuspecting audience! It was a great chat and a bit of a prelude to the upcoming Crowns and Swords panel where I suspect Glenda and Fiona will return to the subject of castles ;).
Also spent a bit of time in the Dealers Room talking to Galaxy Bookshop’s Mark Timmony and then bumped into Karen Miller, a lovely surprise!
In the evening, after a foray into Melbourne’s laneways for dinner (successful) we dropped into the Hilton Bar and spied Cory Doctorow, Kim Stanley Robinson and Jason Nahrung, among others. And we also had the pleasure of meeting Jonathan Strahan, one of the best editors around, and co-editor with Jack Dann of Legends of Australian Fantasy.
And then, finally, it was time for zzzzzzzz.

Voyager authors at AussieCon – Events

Edited on 24 August with the first half of the program.

Border crossing: YA authors writing for adults and vice versa
Thursday 1500 Room 212
Speculative Fiction is notable for the number of authors who readily cross borders and write for both Adults and Young Adults. Some of our finest practitioners discuss the differences and similarities in writing for these two distinct audiences.
Bec Kavanagh (mod), Marianne de Pierres, Pamela Freeman, Cory Doctorow

Breaking the fourth wall: Supernatural and its audience
Thursday 1500 Room 211
What happens when a television series begins to break down the “fourth wall” that divides the characters from the audience watching them? Supernatural has arguably demolished its wall, leading to an uneasy and uncomfortable relationship between the creators and their fans. What other series are playing directly with their audience in this fashion, and who is doing it well? How do you directly connect with your audience, and is it a good idea to do it at all? How does the current climate of Internet communications and social media affect the distance between the shows
that are made and the viewers who watch them?
Karen Miller, Jeanette Auer, Seanan McGuire

Signing:
Thursday 1700 Rm 201
Peter V Brett

Continue reading

The Aust Spec Fic Blog Carnival for January 2009!

In a homage to rhyming, bad poetry and a certain sing-a-long blog
The Spec Fic Blog Carnival has been forced into verse and may leave you agog
With horror, but believe me, it hurt me more than anyone to rhyme.
Anyway, here’s the list of new things in publishing – have a good time!

*quality of starting verse may prepare you for what is to come.

Let’s start with Satima on the Specusphere, latest edition now out!
Followed by the Overlord on OneDollarOrbit – it’s a $1 Shout!
Then comes Simon Haynes interviewing Jim Hines on the Stepsister Scheme
And Simon also achieved his Hal Spacejock e-book dream.

Jennifer Fallon asked: Is epic fantasy on the wane?
Glenda Larke and Neil Gaiman wondered if a judge was insane …. (I think so)
Josh Palmatier was interviewed by Simon Haynes on The Vacant Throne
And Josh was admired by Glenda Larke and many others (they aren’t alone).

The AHWA looked back at 2008 and chose the best dark stories
While ROR (Writers on the Rise) reflected on their shared glories
And look out for Christmas Down Under – submit your story to Festive Fear
Plus Juliet Marillier discusses editing, and sheds blood, sweat and more than one tear.

Import and be damned, said the AWM of parallel importation
On the same topic, Michael Gerard Bauer talked of what is lost in translation.
Brendan Podger thinks fantasy books are getting too big for their boots
And HarperCollins picked up a new division, meaning ABC Books uproots …

Shane Jiraiya Cummings offered fiction for free on his website
Keri Arthur talked about her next release, Deadly Desire … that’s right …
And the search for 10 culture critics on literary cultures now starts,
While the David Gemmell Legend Award captures hearts.

The Aus Writers’ Guild National Screenwriters Conference takes place in Feb
Ticonderoga Online went up in a new format on the web.

That was exhausting, so, in related news, let’s get to a topic that can be really exhausting, because it’s hard work: writing.

Glenda Larke talked about how she writes her books – from the first draft to the last,
Justine Larbalestier gave away a ton of know-how (you won’t get through this fast):
characterisation, getting published, getting unstuck, generating ideas, choosing POVs, NOT writing on what you know!
The Sirens put out their first newsletter of the year
And the AHWA roll out a flash short story comp – get your writing into gear!

Simon Haynes tries to distil his writing into two pages.
Cat Sparks finds the gloom on the web sent her writing through several stages.
Tansy Rayner Roberts responded to Lilith Saintcrow on angry chicks in leather,
And also enjoyed Russell T Davies talking about our generation typing at each other.

Jennifer Fallon helped lazy writers unite,
And Kim Falconer talked of the hero’s fight

Just for fun … and let’s call this freeform because if I see another rhyme … I might become the Hulk.

Why you don’t want a LOLcat as your editor
The wonderful Jason Fischer puts out a new (and free!) story.
Would you answer this ad? Cat Sparks contemplates time travel
AussieCon 4 offers t-shirts – bring on Melbourne September 2010!

And finally …
Karen Miller discusses the new, young Dr Who
That’s Sir Terry to you: Sir Terry Pratchett is awarded a well-deserved knighthood!
We hear more from the Clarion South brigade – this time on their tutors.
Cory Doctorow tells us to watch out for surveillance on New Year’s Day (yikes)
Phil Berrie talks about the pros and cons of Authonomy
And Australian Speculative Fiction Blog Carnival Host is not made poet laureate.

Late breaking news: The Great Gender Debate 09

Alisa Krasnostein on the 25% female authorship
Tansy Rayner Roberts on why it matters
An editor’s genuine opinion – Russell B Farr of Ticonderoga
Girlie Jones looking deeper at gender
Ben Peek writes a letter
Some useful answers to questions about gender inequality

Articles on the subject:
Girls vs Boys as readers by Sherwood Smith
Girlish, moody fiction? No thanks
A Bout of Aboutness: Urban Fantasy and Sword-and-Planet

Go to the home of the Aust Spec Fic Blog Carnival – also known as A Boy Goes On a Journey, a fantastic resource for all Aust Spec Fic writers, run by Nyssa Pascoe.

The November edition of the Captain’s Log is out!

Click the banner above to go to the latest issue which includes a brief piece from Jennifer Fallon on finishing the Tide Lords series, a chance to win the entire Tide Lords series, a review of The Chaos Crystal, news on Little Brother and more!

Exciting news for UK fans of K E Mills

Waterstones UK has chosen The Accidental Sorcerer , book one of the Rogue Agent series for their January book of the month, the same month the book is released in the UK and US. You can read an interview with Karen Miller (she writes under K E Mills for the Rogue Agent series) here and learn more about the other books she has written (including the bestselling Star Wars novels). The Accidental Sorcerer is available in all good books in Australia and is a fantastic alternative fantasy – we at Evil HQ are eagerly awaiting the follow up, Witches Incorporated (coming in April 09).

And whilst we’re talking about excellent overseas news, read a Guardian article about Cory Doctorow here, talking about his writing changing the future, and getting people to think. And as a point of interest for those of you following the Clarion South Writers Workshop posts, the article mentions that Cory attending the CS workshop (presumably the US version) in 1992 and was taught by James Patrick Kelly. Cory’s book Little Brother will be released in Australia in January (which means it will be in stores in late December) and it’s a cracker of a book.

Aurealis praise for Voyager authors

The Daughters of Moab

The Daughters of Moab

It’s lovely to see the kind of praise Voyager authors are getting – ranging from magazines as new and happening as Black to the prestigious Aurealis Magazine. At the Aurealis website you can see Keith Stevenson’s glowing review of Kim Westwood’s debut novel, The Daughters of Moab. ‘This is the best debut novel I have seen in many years, which comes as no surprise to those of us who have followed Kim’s short story writing career.’ Keith really gets this book.

Find out more about Kim Westwood

On the same page is a review for the wonderful Dreaming Again anthology, edited by

Dreaming Again

Dreaming Again

Jack Dann, ‘I’ve just looked over the table of contents again and if I were to list the stories that I found really enjoyable, the tales that raised the stakes even from established writers with nothing more to prove, we’d be here for a long time … If you have been swithering over purchasing a copy, then swither no more.’
Totally agree, and I’m very pleased to say that several authors from the Clarion South Writers Workshop (many of whom featured in Dreaming Again) are writing some upcoming blog posts for us.

Visit editor (and writer) Jack Dann’s website

Little Brother

Little Brother

And … a review for a book that Harper Voyager will be releasing in January in Australia (which means it will in stores in December), that lots of us have read and really enjoyed. ‘I was going to review this in the special YA section that takes up the second half of this issue’s column, but Little Brother is a book that should be read by everyone and my copy has gone straight into the hands of my thirteen year old son. I suggest you do the same.’

I think Keith has hit on the key thing about this book – it really is relevant to all ages and people, and extremely enjoyable. Most of Team Voyager has read it – based on each other’s recommendations – and it’s short and pacey enough to get through in a day. And it will really leave you thinking … a review will be appearing in an upcoming edition of The Captain’s Log.

Visit the Little Brother website and download the free book

Click here to go to the Aurealis Online sf/horror Review Column for the full text of the reviews + plenty more

Whilst we’re at Aurealis: don’t forget – nominations for the Aurealis Awards CLOSE next Friday (Hallowe’en). Nominate works before time runs out!