• Fiona McIntosh: Voyager Author of the Month

    Fiona McIntosh was born and raised in Sussex in the UK, but also spent early childhood years in West Africa. She left a PR career in London to travel and settled in Australia in 1980. She has since roamed the world working for her own travel publishing company, which she runs with her husband. She lives in Adelaide with her husband and twin sons. Her website is at www.fionamcintosh.com.

    Her latest book, The Scrivener's Tale, is a stand-alone and takes us back to the world of Morgravia from her very first series, The Quickening:


    About The Scrivener's Tale:

    In the bookshops and cafes of present-day Paris, ex-psychologist Gabe Figaret is trying to put his shattered life back together. When another doctor, Reynard, asks him to help with a delusional female patient, Gabe is reluctant... until he meets her. At first Gabe thinks the woman, Angelina, is merely terrified of Reynard, but he quickly discovers she is not quite what she seems.

    As his relationship with Angelina deepens, Gabe's life in Paris becomes increasingly unstable. He senses a presence watching and following every move he makes, and yet he finds Angelina increasingly irresistible.

    When Angelina tells Gabe he must kill her and flee to a place she calls Morgravia, he is horrified. But then Angelina shows him that the cathedral he has dreamt about since childhood is real and exists in Morgravia.

    A special 10th Anniversary edition of her first fantasy book, Myrren's Gift, will be released in December!

     

     

Revenge is sweet … Fiona McIntosh’s new book …

Coming this September, the start of a new epic series by the author of the Quickening and Trinity trilogies.

Royal Exile

Those of you who have finished Goddess will be please to know that Fiona McIntosh has completed the opening volume to a new series called Valisar.  Royal Exile releases in September this year – and we’re very excited about it. The series is set in a world familiar to those who have enjoyed The Quickening, and will not disappoint!

 An early review from Australian Bookseller and Publisher says:

The writing is straightforward and explanatory, with the plot unfolding in short, episodic chapters. The action is crisp and surprisingly brutal, with central characters regularly (and graphically) dispatched throughout. This ruthlessness is often surprisingly missing from epic fantasy, but McIntosh wields it with relish and aplomb.

Fiona will be writing some blog posts here so keep an eye out for those, and if September still seems too far away for you, then maybe it’s time to reread the Percheron trilogy one last time!

 

Here’s a brief excerpt of a review for Goddess, the final book in the Percheron trilogy, that appeared on the SFX website:

Sling on your veil, step into your bellydancing bikini and shake those hips (girls, you can do the same), cos Fiona McIntosh is pulling out the stops for this third and final volume in Percheron, her Arabian fantasy series …

… Influenced by The Arabian Nights, this series also has its fair share of illicit sex, manipulative females, and vicious demons, although McIntosh’s tale is told less for the “moral lesson” quality of the original 1001 Nights and more for the sheer thrill of heroic deeds and adventure in exotic lands.

The author may insist that she writes purely for these thrills, but serious underlying themes are still embedded throughout Percheron. The main subtext focuses on the harsh consequences of doing “the right thing”: how actions that seem detrimental will actually produce huge positive kickbacks; and how the suffering and sacrifice you personally experience right now will achieve long term goals for the good of the many.

Click here to go the full review.  

The Goddess review was written by Sandy Auden (c) SFX magazine 2008, reproduced with permission of the publisher, and originally appeared in issue 171 of SFX Magazine

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One Response

  1. I love the comment on the ‘ruthlessness’.

    In all of Fiona’s books, she does not shy away from the harsher scenes like some authors, and it brings you closer to the story rather than the typical ‘fade to black’ sort of scenes. I really admire her for not glossing over the darker parts.

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